Squire Patton Boggs expands Middle East practice with new office in Beirut

The firm has also obtained a license to operate in Saudi Arabia

Squire Patton Boggs expands Middle East practice with new office in Beirut

Squire Patton Boggs has opened an office in Beirut, continuing an international expansion strategy that has seen the firm build upon its Middle East practice and recently launch new offices in Ireland and The Netherlands.

“Our firm has significant, long-standing client relationships in Lebanon and its surrounding countries who we support on complex international disputes, policy and other commercial matters,” said chair and global CEO Mark Ruehlmann. “Our new office in Beirut will enhance our ability to serve these clients and signifies our commitment to meeting the evolving needs of the markets we serve.”

The firm has also obtained its law license in Saudi Arabia, making it one of the first firms to be granted a license to operate in the Kingdom from the Saudi Ministry of Justice.

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“The coming decade promises to be a time of immense growth and development in Saudi Arabia and this marks another exciting milestone in our Middle East expansion strategy,” said the firm’s Middle East practice co-chairs Gassan Baloul and Tom Wilson.

The firm submitted its application for a license in the Kingdom earlier this year.

Squire Patton Boggs also recently hired corporate/M&A partner Omar Momany and financial services partner Nima Faith in Dubai.

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