Wynn Williams secures spot in 2022 Chambers and Partners rankings

Recognition is confirmation of firm's commitment to excellence, says national managing partner

Wynn Williams secures spot in 2022 Chambers and Partners rankings

Wynn Williams has announced that it has once again been ranked in 2022 Chambers and Partners Global and Asia-Pacific legal directories.

For 2022, five of the firm’s key practice areas have included in the Chambers rankings. These practice areas include corporate & commercial, dispute resolution, environment & resource management, employment, and insurance.

In addition, Chambers have individually recognised the following Wynn William partners:

  • Ash Hill − corporate & commercial
  • Shane Campbell − dispute resolution
  • Philip Maw and Lucy de Latour − environment & resource management
  • Amanda Douglas − employment
  • Richard Hern – insurance

They were ranked based on their legal knowledge and experience, ability, effectiveness, and client service.

According to firm’s national managing partner Philip Maw, the recognition is confirmation of Wynn Williams’ commitment to excellence, both in terms of the law and our approach to client service.

Based in London, Chambers and Partners is an independent research company operating across 200 jurisdictions delivering detailed rankings and insight into the world’s leading lawyers. It ranks leading law firms and individual lawyers based on in-depth research and interviews with lawyers’ clients and peers.

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