NZBA pushes for Te Ao Māori inclusion in legal education curriculums

Tikanga is "as an important area of continuing professional development for lawyers in practice"

NZBA pushes for Te Ao Māori inclusion in legal education curriculums

The New Zealand Bar Association | Nga Ahorangi Motuhake o te Ture has endorsed the inclusion of Te Ao Māori in legal education curriculums. 

The organisation expressed its belief that law school graduates must have a strong foundation in the statutory frameworks and case law involving tikanga. Tikanga, the Bar Association said, has been acknowledged as a significant area of continuing professional development for practising lawyers.

The New Zealand Council of Legal Education consulted with the Bar Association on incorporating Tikanga Māori into the legal education curriculum in July 2021. The Bar Association backed the initiative, which it still supports today.

Moreover, Te Hunga Rōia Māori o Aotearoa | The Māori Law Society expressed the importance of adding Tikanga Māori to the legal education material for law students, a view affirmed by the Bar Association.

The association urged lawyers who are interested in the initiative as well as members of the public to review the Law Commission's September 2023 Study Paper, He Poutama (NZLC SP24). Law Commission Commissioner Justice Whata led the production of the paper. 

 

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