MinterEllisonRuddWatts moves Auckland headquarters

The staff relocated to the new PwC Tower today

MinterEllisonRuddWatts moves Auckland headquarters

MinterEllisonRuddWatts has moved its Auckland headquarters.

The firm will take three and a half floors in the new PwC Tower on Commercial Bay. Its 245-strong staff relocated to the new workspace today.

The building’s excellent location was a major factor in the decision to make the transition.

“Our move places us at the centre of Auckland’s newest professional services hub, and our work environment has been purposely designed to support collaboration, innovation and efficiency,” said Andrew Poole, MinterEllisonRuddWatts chief executive.

He said that the new office was a place where “our team and our clients can work together to deliver exceptional outcomes for New Zealand” as the firm worked to help bolster the economic environment.

“We are looking forward to welcoming our clients into our new space and working alongside them to help develop New Zealand’s new economy,” Poole said.

Major architectural firm Jasmax designed MinterEllisonRuddWatts’ new office, which was developed with collaboration, efficiency and wellbeing as the main areas of focus.

“The result is an environment that is a sharp departure from traditional law firms and signals a new approach to workplace design,” MinterEllisonRuddWatts said.

The firm said it “adopted a design that encourages flexibility, agility and collaboration—and supported by integrated technology.”

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