Bell Gully bags women-empowerment award a third time

“Across the firm, there are diversity champions who ensure our policies and objectives are being met”

Bell Gully bags women-empowerment award a third time

Bell Gully has again been recognised for its efforts in empowering women with an accolade in this year's White Camellia Awards.

Organised by the UN Women National Committee Aotearoa New Zealand, the awards celebrate companies who lead in implementing women-empowerment principles, promoting fair and equal workplaces.

“Across the firm, there are diversity champions who ensure our policies and objectives are being met. We are very conscious that there is more for us to achieve in this field and we look forward to continuing various initiatives and projects to support gender diversity at Bell Gully,” said Anna Buchly, Bell Gully chair.

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Partner Angela Harford said it was humbling to hear the work that both large and small businesses across the country are doing to promote diversity.

“We are proud to support the UN Women's Empowerment Principles in the workplace and are inspired to achieve higher goals in the future,” she said.

Harford accepted the award on behalf of the firm at Parliament House earlier this week. This is the third White Camellia Award won by Bell Gully, which also received the award in 2014 and 2015.

Last year, South Island firm Portia won the White Camellia Award for Small Businesses. In 2017, Simpson Grierson took home the White Camellia Award. The award was won by ANZ in 2016.

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